Working at the Farm - Took a few I-Phone Pics

Discussion in 'Property Tours' started by Native Hunter, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Todd. That's what I did last year on persimmon and apple topworking - left the tape until the next spring. The July 3 wind storm of last year got the best ones I had, but the ones it didn't get did just fine without removing the tape.

    I've got so many topworked trees going this year, I don't want to do the wrong thing. I've found that getting the scions to take is the easy part. The hard part is keeping them from breaking off before they harden up at the graft. Pretty soon I'm going to do some bracing with cane sticks at places where I can. Not sure how I'm going to do that on the tree that has 14 scions.:D
     
  2. dogdoc

    dogdoc Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    I lose several of my persimmon bark grafts every year due to high wind. The first year I probably loss 50%. The following year I used bamboo supports and dropped that number to about 25%.
     
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  3. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    The annual JUNGLE maintenance took place today. A few pics to share.

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    I'm scratched up and beat up a little bit but ready for more fun........
     
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  4. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Those little acorns are on Chinkapin Oak I set 12 or 13 years ago. I noticed a lot of oak trees set back then that are loaded with acorns this year.
     
  5. dogdoc

    dogdoc Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    Amazing the diversity of plants you get around a spring. Beautiful picture. Looks like plenty of poison ivy and a very healthy fern.
     
  6. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yes indeed. This spring comes out of the ground not far above where I took the pic. That area is out in the open and covered with all kinds of good stuff - especially jewelweed.
     
  7. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    A few more pics:

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    This persimmon won't need topworking. I set this as a seedling several years ago.




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  8. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Should be no pollination problem here. Two big chestnuts growing together and touching.

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    Welcome to the Jungle

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  9. CentralKyHunter

    CentralKyHunter Active Member

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    Awesome stuff as always, your place is like a piece of fine art to those of us that love habitat work!!!
     
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  10. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    6-10-17 Update


    That Jungle I posted the picture of above requires some work in order to shape the destiny of the forest. For instance, you will notice the big yellow poplar to the right of the picture. That's actually a tree that I planted, but notice how it has outgrown the nearby red oaks. I took that tree out today as well as a few more poplars and some volunteer sweetgums.

    I hated to cut such a nice tree, but I would rather have the oaks, and there is a chance that it could shade some of them out in time. Each spring (usually about now), I go in and do this type of work. The time has come that doing this work inside is going to end, but I will continue to work some around the edges in the future.

    This is a big volunteer sweetgum I had previously left. It served its purpose of making the oaks nearby it grow straight and tall. But now it needed to come out. It could outgrow them and shade them out eventually. So, out it comes.

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    This is a big poplar at the edge that I took down. Notice a small tree with a white ribbon between it and the white pine. That is a small persimmon at a good place. The poplar goes and the persimmon grows. The hard part of this is cleaning up the mess out of the food plot at this edge.

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    This illustrates the size of many of my oaks that I planted. That big poplar was standing right beside it.

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    Some random tree pics from in the NH Jungle.

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    Some apple pics from the East Side of the Jungle Planting.

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    JUST SAY NO TO WIMPY ELDERBERRIES

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    I'm not seeing any good bucks yet, but have a few trail cam pics to share.

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    That's about it for today. I'm resting from all the sawing. Putting them down is not hard but cleaning up the brush gets to me in the hot sun. Enjoy
     
  11. KDdid

    KDdid Active Member

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    Wow. I've never picked elderberries from a ladder before.


    Sent from my iPhone using Deer Hunter Forum
     
  12. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I hope they eventually stop. I don't want to shell out the cash for a bucket truck....:D
     
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  13. lakngolf

    lakngolf Well-Known Member

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    Healthy Jungle there NH. I know Tarzan enjoys swinging thru with chainsaw in hand.!
     
  14. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    What are you doing with the elderberries?
     
  15. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Actually I don't pay much attention to them. Too many other goodies that I like out there such as apples, pears, blackberries, low bush blueberries, chestnuts, etc.

    I was kind of joking about the bucket truck.
     
  16. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Lak, I can't get my Jane counterpart to swing with me out there.
     
  17. Mennoniteman

    Mennoniteman Well-Known Member

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    Elderberry makes the best pies and jelly if the birds don't get them first. Deer like browsing them too.
     
  18. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Yep, I couldn't get them established in the tree planting without cages. I tried and they just kept them trimmed back. The first year I caged some, I had one to shoot out a couple of saplings 9 feet tall. I guess the roots were establishing even though the tops were being eaten.

    Here is another one that came up wild in a fence row down by my barn. I now have some wild ones coming up at different places. My farm was a cattle farm before I started this about 12 years ago. The cows kept them from coming up wild.

    In the pic you will also notice a native red mulberry coming up behind it. All kind of free goodies out there if you just find it and give it an advantage over the competition. That's a big part of my habitat methodology - nature is all about what has the advantage. With many things, that only requires a little effort.

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  19. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Native - you see much deer use on your blueberries? I have been considering getting a few just for giggles, but wasn't sure how the deer reacted to them. I figured I may need to put them in some sort or wire shelter to limit browsing, but I like the idea of the variety.....I just haven't take that step yet.
     
  20. Native Hunter

    Native Hunter Well-Known Member

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    This is going to sound strange, but I started that blueberry bush with a cage and it has been growing a couple of years. I ran out of caging material the other day when setting some crabapples. I knew the little crab would be eaten, so, I stole the cage from the blueberry.

    Since I removed that cage, I haven't seen a deer touch that blueberry bush. I may walk out there someday and it be demolished, but so far not touched.

    I have some wild lowbush blueberries that don't seem to be browsed. I can't really tell if deer are eating the berries, because the ground is so hard and covered with leaves at that spot I can't really see tracks.

    Heck, if they don't eat the bushes, I will plant some more for myself. I will be watching.

    But I also stole a cage from a European Hazelnut, and it got hammered.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2017

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