Building Fence Crossing Steps

Discussion in 'How to Build Stuff' started by Gravel Road, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Gravel Road

    Gravel Road Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I've been wanting to build a set of stairs to cross my barbed wire fence and finally got off my butt and did it. Free bed frames got the wheels turning and they turned out to be perfect for the job. Just as a note, some of the newer cheap bed frames are pretty light duty so might not work for this.

    Hit the rivet heads with a grinder with a cutoff wheel to get the main rails free from the legs. Or, you can drill them out. It’s pretty hard material, so the grinder seems to work better.


    You can leave the slotted sections on the ends, as they make a flat section to keep things from sinking into the dirt. The slotted end even makes a nice hand hold on the top side. The length of mine was 76”.


    Set the length needed to make the angle to go over the fence and have enough of a “V” to be sturdy. I used a 66.5” length to bring the angle to 35 degrees. Then just clamp and weld.


    The smaller extra bed frame section I had didn’t seem sturdy enough for the steps, so I used 1 inch square tubing and welded them around 13” apart.


    Use another short frame section to create the two cross braces. These are drilled and bolted to the rails so you can run them between the fence wires once positioned.


    Some cheap camo paint and you are ready for action!


    I’m really happy with the way this turned out. Taking some cheap materials and turning it into something useful was fun and a good way to spend a rainy day in the shop. Having the rails extend over the steps worked out great because you have something to hang onto while stepping over the top. Honestly, I don’t think I’d change anything about it except for maybe some green in the paint job. I thought about making it out of wood, but those seem really bulky and I’d have to worry about it while burning pasture.


    Oh, and no more laying down in the wet grass and snow trying to slide under (or between) the barbed wire. No more torn hunting clothes or loud fence noises while trying to sneak into the stand in the dark!
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  2. Oakseeds

    Oakseeds Active Member

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    SH 7 Braces resize.png Nice ladder work. I am currently constructing a shooter house using steel for the platform frame. I used a couple of older model bed frames (used the same angle grinder procedure to clean them up) as a couple of cross braces connecting 2 pairs of steel frame legs. I'll post better pictures when I get a little further along with the project. Another thing I did that worked out better than expected involved using scaffolding cross braces as cross braces on the legs of my house. Again, I used an angle grinder to burn off the pin in the X in the middle of the scaffold brace to produce a couple of separate 8' long steel poles with holes drilled on both ends. They matched up perfectly with the square steel poles I am using for the frame of my house. In the attached photo you can see one of the bed frame pieces connecting two legs of the overall frame at the lower level in the photo (toward the back of the structure). Also, you can clearly see a couple of the scaffolding braces used as cross braces on my structure. They are incredibly solid; not a bit of shake.
     
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  3. j-bird

    j-bird Well-Known Member

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    Cool idea. I will say...based on personal experience....that in the dark, with a horse right behind you...and you don't know how close it is....a good snort from the horse....and you don't need a ladder or even a gate to clear a fence! You might need a new pair of pants however.
     
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  4. lakngolf

    lakngolf Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Lake Martin, Al, (8a)
    That will get the job done.
    Another idea is a V or Z opening for just walking thru. Several years ago my Dad built a few.
    At gate post (or anywhere in fence line) simply install another post about two feet apart. Install a V shaped structure coming off the gate post that goes well past the second post. Most large animals cannot make the turn the a human can make. My only issue was if I have too much stuff in my back pack.
     
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  5. Drycreek

    Drycreek Well-Known Member

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    I think that will work ! I wish I had built one on a lease I had for years in Central Texas. Every time I crossed that fence I was a soprano for the next hour or so......
     
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  6. Gravel Road

    Gravel Road Well-Known Member

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    That's an interesting idea. Very cool!
     
  7. Gravel Road

    Gravel Road Well-Known Member

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    That's going to be awesome when you get it done. Be sure to post pics.
     
  8. Gravel Road

    Gravel Road Well-Known Member

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    That's gold :D
     
  9. Jack Terpack

    Jack Terpack Well-Known Member

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    Is that the same as walking in in the dark and stepping on a grouse? Been there and I still get chills thinking about it.
     

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